Image of the Day

Specially curated
365 Days, 365 Images
of National/International
Photographers

An Image a Day
Let us engage with this
Fascinating Medium that
Breaks all boundaries

HELMUT NEWTON
© Helmut Newton | Image source internet

Helmut Newton

My job as a portrait photographer is to seduce, amuse and entertain.”

–Helmut Newton

Helmut Newton (1920 – 2004) was a German-Australian photographer. The New York Times described him as a “prolific, widely imitated fashion photographer whose provocative, erotically charged black-and-white photos were a mainstay of Vogue and other publications.  Born to a Jewish family in Berlin in 1920, Newton received his first camera at 12 years old, often neglecting his studies in school to pursue photography.

As a teenager, Newton worked as an apprentice to theater photographer Yva in Berlin. He fled increasing Nazi oppression in Germany in 1938, shortly after Kristallnacht, and worked in Singapore and Australia during World War II, serving in the Australian army for several years. He later opened up a photography studio and returned to Europe in the 1950s. In Paris, he began working for French Vogue, and later Harper’s BazaarPlayboyElle, and other publications during the 1950s and 1960s as his reputation grew, traveling frequently throughout the world on assignments.

Known for the dramatic lighting and unconventional poses of his models in his photographs, Newton’s work has been characterized as obsessive and subversive, incorporating themes of sadomasochism, prostitution, violence, and persistently overt sexuality into the narratives of his images. He increasingly focused more on these images rather than fashion photography in the 1970s, publishing several books of his work such as White Women (1976), Big Nudes (1981), and World Without Men (1984).

He continued to travel later in life, dividing his time between his homes in Monte Carlo and Los Angeles. In 2003, he died in a car crash in Los Angeles, at 84 years old. Among other honors, Newton received the German Kodak Award for Photographic Books, a Life Legend Award from Life magazine, and an award from the American Institute for Graphic Arts.  As a photographer who straddled the gap between art and commerce, Helmut Newton always managed to surprise and polarize his audience. Among the editorial staff of many magazines, he encountered creative kindred spirits, who responded to his unusual visual ideas. The result was a body of photographs that were not only exceptionally recognizable and successful but also reached millions of viewers through magazine publications.

Published on August 3, 2021
See All Image of the Day | 365 days, 365 images

Share

Home » Image of the day » Untitled | Helmut Newton

Related Posts

Herero people of Namibia | Jim Naughten

November 20th, 2021|

Jim Naughten is a British Photographer, who originates from Bonaire,  Central America. Born in 1969, Jim Naughten was predominantly influenced by the 1980s. The 1980s were a tumultuous period culturally, and were marked by growing global capitalism, global mass media, significant discrepancies in wealth, alongside a distinctive sense of music and fashion, epitomised by electronic pop music and hip hop. Artists growing up during this time were heavily influenced by this cultural environment.

Andy Warhol by Albert Watson, 1985

November 12th, 2021|

Albert Watson (born 1942) is a Scottish fashion, celebrity and art photographer. He has shot over 100 covers of Vogue and 40 covers of Rolling Stone magazine since the mid-1970s, and has created major advertising campaigns for clients such as Prada, Chanel and Levis. Watson has also taken some well-known photographs, from the portrait of Steve Jobs that appeared on the cover of his biography, a photo of Alfred Hitchcock holding a plucked goose, and a portrait of a nude Kate Moss taken on her 19th birthday.

Paul’s Legs by Peter Hujar, 1979 | Image of the day

October 25th, 2021|

Peter Hujar (1934 – 1987) was an American photographer best known for his black and white portraits. He has been recognized posthumously as a major American photographer of the late-twentieth century. His countless square format works are direct, yet rendered with evocative tonal contrasts enhanced through his meticulous darkroom process. Among his subjects are scenes of death, the margins of New York's nightlife, cityscapes, landscapes, and intimate pictures of close friends and lovers.

The House of the Ballenesque | Roger Ballen

September 29th, 2021|

Roger Ballen (born 1950) is an American artist living in Johannesburg, South Africa. He born in New York in 1950 but for over 30 years he has lived and worked in South Africa. His work as a geologist took him out into the countryside and led him to take up his camera and explore the hidden world of small South African towns. At first, he explored the empty streets in the glare of the midday sun but, once he had made the step of knocking on people’s doors, he discovered a world inside these houses which were to have a profound effect on his work.

2021-08-09T15:35:34+05:30
Go to Top