Image of the Day

Specially curated
365 Days, 365 Images
of National/International
Photographers

An Image a Day
Let us engage with this
Fascinating Medium that
Breaks all boundaries

Les Krims
Mary’s Middle Class © Les Krism 1985 | Image source internet

Les Krism

Leslie Robert (Les) Krims (1942) is a conceptualist photographer living in Buffalo, New York. He is noted for his carefully arranged fabricated photographs (called “fictions”), various candid series, a satirical edge, dark humor, and long-standing criticism of what he describes as leftist twaddle. His controversial images resembling tableaus deal with taboos surrounding sex, race, and consumer culture. He often portrays nudes in unusual, shocking, or comical situations as seen in his photobook Making Chicken Soup (1972).

Born Leslie Robert Krims on August 16, 1942 in Brooklyn, NY, he attended the Cooper Union for his BFA and later received his MFA from Pratt Institute. After finishing his degree, Krims began teaching photography first at the Rochester Institute of Technology and then Buffalo State College where he has been a professor for over 40 years and has mentored students such as Cindy Sherman. The artist’s works are held in the collections of The Museum of Modern Art in Brooklyn, the George Eastman House in Rochester, and the National Gallery of Canada in Ottawa, among others. Krims continues to live and work in Buffalo, NY.

Les Krims has published numerous offset works. In his portfolio The Deerslayers (1972), Krims took pictures of deer hunters who had voluntarily stopped at “deer check stations” so that NYS conservationists could examine the general health of the deer. Pictured posing with their kills, Krims suggested the hunters had much in common with performance art and odd manifestations of sculpture. He also attempted to underscore the American nature and long tradition of deer hunting as one aspect of criticism of animal rights and anti-Vietnam War activists.
In The Little People of America (1971), Krims received permission to photograph people belonging to a national organization founded by the actor Billy Barty, called “The Little People of America.” Many of the pictures were made at national conventions of the L.P.A, in Oakland, CA, and Atlanta, GA. Krims sought to show that the people he photographed were brave, normal people, having more in common with the Mid-West than the Upper-West-Side, unlike the way the dwarf was portrayed in the history of art or contemporary photographs.

In The Incredible Case Of The Stack O’Wheat Murders (1972), Krims both parodies forensic photography, and points to it as a remarkable archive of incredible and moving images (the various, successful CSI television series attests to his prescience). In each “Wheats” crime scene, a Stack O’Wheats (pancakes) is placed near each “victim” (he used friends and family to pose for the pictures). Each stack is topped with pats of butter and syrup, the number of pancakes in the stack signifying the number of the crime. Hershey’s chocolate syrup was used to simulate blood in the photos, which was formed into words and celestial shapes. Krims originally included 8 ounces of Hershey’s syrup in a heat-sealed plastic bag with the original print portfolio, as well as “enough pancake mix to make one complete Stack O’ Wheats”.

In Making Chicken Soup (1972), Krims published pictures of his mother preparing her traditional chicken soup recipe, while nude. These pictures were published as a small book, some say giving rise years later to the popular Chicken Soup series. The book contained a dedication, which underscored the real point of the satire: “This book is dedicated to my mother and concerned photographers, both make chicken soup.” Krims felt that “socially concerned” photography was a palliative, just as the chicken soup was—in the long run, an ineffective remedy for serious disease.

In Fictocryptokrimsographs, published in 1975, Krims used a Polaroid SX-70 camera to make a series of 40, titled pictures. The SX-70 was chosen, because of the ability to literally move and work the not yet dry, viscous, film emulsion much like paint after the picture developed. Included are various odd and humorous pictures, which are often puns or parodies of fashion trends.

Krims has also steadily been adding pictures to an overarching project spanning three decades called, “The Decline of the Left.” His works are exhibited in the U.S. and internationally.

Published on March 1, 2021
See All Image of the Day | 365 days, 365 images

Share

Home » Image of the day » Today's Image » Mary’s Middle Class | Les Krism 1985

Related Posts

Herero people of Namibia | Jim Naughten

November 20th, 2021|

Jim Naughten is a British Photographer, who originates from Bonaire,  Central America. Born in 1969, Jim Naughten was predominantly influenced by the 1980s. The 1980s were a tumultuous period culturally, and were marked by growing global capitalism, global mass media, significant discrepancies in wealth, alongside a distinctive sense of music and fashion, epitomised by electronic pop music and hip hop. Artists growing up during this time were heavily influenced by this cultural environment.

Andy Warhol by Albert Watson, 1985

November 12th, 2021|

Albert Watson (born 1942) is a Scottish fashion, celebrity and art photographer. He has shot over 100 covers of Vogue and 40 covers of Rolling Stone magazine since the mid-1970s, and has created major advertising campaigns for clients such as Prada, Chanel and Levis. Watson has also taken some well-known photographs, from the portrait of Steve Jobs that appeared on the cover of his biography, a photo of Alfred Hitchcock holding a plucked goose, and a portrait of a nude Kate Moss taken on her 19th birthday.

Paul’s Legs by Peter Hujar, 1979 | Image of the day

October 25th, 2021|

Peter Hujar (1934 – 1987) was an American photographer best known for his black and white portraits. He has been recognized posthumously as a major American photographer of the late-twentieth century. His countless square format works are direct, yet rendered with evocative tonal contrasts enhanced through his meticulous darkroom process. Among his subjects are scenes of death, the margins of New York's nightlife, cityscapes, landscapes, and intimate pictures of close friends and lovers.

The House of the Ballenesque | Roger Ballen

September 29th, 2021|

Roger Ballen (born 1950) is an American artist living in Johannesburg, South Africa. He born in New York in 1950 but for over 30 years he has lived and worked in South Africa. His work as a geologist took him out into the countryside and led him to take up his camera and explore the hidden world of small South African towns. At first, he explored the empty streets in the glare of the midday sun but, once he had made the step of knocking on people’s doors, he discovered a world inside these houses which were to have a profound effect on his work.

2021-04-07T15:55:25+05:30
Go to Top