Image of the Day

Specially curated
365 Days, 365 Images
of National/International
Photographers

An Image a Day
Let us engage with this
Fascinating Medium that
Breaks all boundaries

Charles Jourdan Spring 1979 © Guy Bourdin | Image source internet
Charles Jourdan Spring 1979 © Guy Bourdin | Image source internet

Guy Bourdin

Guy Bourdin (1928-1991) is a French artist. This autodidact was born and lived in Paris, where he practiced his art from the 1950s to the end of the 1980s. For more than thirty years, he pushed the boundaries of fashion photography and his work still remains a source of inspiration and fascination. He is considered as one of the best-photographers of fashion and advertising of the second half of the 20th century.

From 1955, Bourdin worked mostly with Vogue as well as other publications including Harper’s Bazaar. He shot ad campaigns for Chanel, Charles Jourdan, Pentax, and Bloomingdale’s. A protégé of the iconic Surrealist artist Man Ray, Bourdin began exhibiting his drawings and photographs in the early 1950s, landing his first fashion shoot in 1955 in Vogue Paris. Once he began work as a fashion photographer, Bourdin eschewed exhibitions and monographs, feeling that his images functioned exclusively in magazines. However, his works are collected by important institutions including Tate in London, MoMA, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, and Getty Museum. The first retrospective exhibition of his work was held at the Victoria & Albert Museum in London in 2003, and then toured the National Gallery of Victoria in Melbourne, Australia, and the Galerie Nationale du Jeu de Paume in Paris. The Tate is permanently exhibiting a part of its collection (one of the largest) with works made between 1950 and 1955

Guy Bourdin set the stage for a new kind of fashion photography. Described in TIME Magazine as “tiptoeing to the edge of pornography but ending up at art,” Bourdin is best known for his iconoclastic photographs of fragmented women’s bodies, considered alternately objectifying and empowering. This distinct style emerged in the 1970s, as his shocking, sensual, and sometimes unsettling images revolutionized commercial and editorial photography. Renowned for his suggestive staging, meticulous sets, and surrealist aesthetics, he broke with the conventions of commercial photography through relentless perfectionism, scathing humor, and a real artistic vision. Unclassifiable, unpredictable, versatile, and an almost sadistic taskmaster and perfectionist, Guy Bourdin remains an enigma.

Published on January 2, 2021
See All Image of the Day | 365 days, 365 images

Share

Home » Image of the day » Charles Jourdan Spring 1979 | Guy Bourdin

Related Posts

Herero people of Namibia | Jim Naughten

November 20th, 2021|

Jim Naughten is a British Photographer, who originates from Bonaire,  Central America. Born in 1969, Jim Naughten was predominantly influenced by the 1980s. The 1980s were a tumultuous period culturally, and were marked by growing global capitalism, global mass media, significant discrepancies in wealth, alongside a distinctive sense of music and fashion, epitomised by electronic pop music and hip hop. Artists growing up during this time were heavily influenced by this cultural environment.

Andy Warhol by Albert Watson, 1985

November 12th, 2021|

Albert Watson (born 1942) is a Scottish fashion, celebrity and art photographer. He has shot over 100 covers of Vogue and 40 covers of Rolling Stone magazine since the mid-1970s, and has created major advertising campaigns for clients such as Prada, Chanel and Levis. Watson has also taken some well-known photographs, from the portrait of Steve Jobs that appeared on the cover of his biography, a photo of Alfred Hitchcock holding a plucked goose, and a portrait of a nude Kate Moss taken on her 19th birthday.

Paul’s Legs by Peter Hujar, 1979 | Image of the day

October 25th, 2021|

Peter Hujar (1934 – 1987) was an American photographer best known for his black and white portraits. He has been recognized posthumously as a major American photographer of the late-twentieth century. His countless square format works are direct, yet rendered with evocative tonal contrasts enhanced through his meticulous darkroom process. Among his subjects are scenes of death, the margins of New York's nightlife, cityscapes, landscapes, and intimate pictures of close friends and lovers.

The House of the Ballenesque | Roger Ballen

September 29th, 2021|

Roger Ballen (born 1950) is an American artist living in Johannesburg, South Africa. He born in New York in 1950 but for over 30 years he has lived and worked in South Africa. His work as a geologist took him out into the countryside and led him to take up his camera and explore the hidden world of small South African towns. At first, he explored the empty streets in the glare of the midday sun but, once he had made the step of knocking on people’s doors, he discovered a world inside these houses which were to have a profound effect on his work.

2021-04-07T14:17:31+05:30
Go to Top